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Αιγεύς Εταιρεία Αιγαιακής Προϊστορίας

ΑΡΘΡΑ | 2021

Des «lames de Karanovo» dans le site néolithique d’Uğurlu (île de Gökçeada, Turquie)

Bulletin de Correspondance Hellénique 135.1 (2011) [2013]: 1-19.

Η προέλευση και ο τρόπος εξέλιξης των πρώτων αγροτικών κοινωνιών των Βορειοανατολικών Βαλκανίων ανάμεσα στα τέλη της έβδομης και την έκτη χιλιετία αποτελούν ζητήματα που δεν έχουν ακόμη ξεκαθαριστεί. Η θέση Uğurlu στο νησί Gökçeada στο βορειοανατολικό Αιγαίο ρίχνει νέο φως στη συζήτηση.

Imprint as punctuations of material itineraries

in Hahn Hans Peter & Weiss Hadas (eds), Mobility, Meaning and Transformations of Things. Shifting Context of Material Culture through Time and Space (Oxford 2013), 36-49.

In the film Alps, by avant-garde Greek director Yorgos Lanthimos, a small circle of acquaintances (who call themselves Alps) decide to help those grieving the loss of a loved one by substituting for the deceased. One couple has lost their tennis-playing daughter to a car accident. The nurse who tends to her in her last days is a member of Alps and persuades the couple to let her fill in for their daughter, at least for a time, to ease their grief.

Bright as the sun: The appropriation of amber object in Mycenaean Greece

in Hahn Hans Peter & Weiss Hadas (eds), Mobility, Meaning and Transformations of Things. Shifting Context of Material Culture through Time and Space (Oxford 2013), 147-169.

The archaeological treatment of intersocietal exchange has suffered from the diffusionist legacy of directing attention to the reconstruction of abstract flows of cultural traits, while neglecting changes in meaning brought about by the agency of the social actors who integrated such traits into local contexts.

Interaction and acculturation: The Aegean and the central Mediterranean in the Late Bronze Age

in Hartmut Matthäus, Norbert Oettinger & Stephan Schröder (eds) 2011. Der Orient und die Anfänge Europas. Kulturelle Beziehungen von der Späten Bronzezeit bis zur Frühen Eisenzeit [Philippika, Marburger alterumskundliche Abhandlungen 42]. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz Verlag, 109-126.

Since the interrelation between the Aegean and the Central Mediterranean is a historical phenomenon that lasted more than five centuries - a very long period in which crucial changes affected both areas - a refinement in comparing the two chronological sequences seems necessary.

Far-flung Phoenicians bearing early Greek pottery?

in Hartmut Matthäus, Norbert Oettinger & Stephan Schröder (eds) 2011. Der Orient und die Anfänge Europas. Kulturelle Beziehungen von der Späten Bronzezeit bis zur Frühen Eisenzeit [Philippika, Marburger alterumskundliche Abhandlungen 42]. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz Verlag, 177-184.

One of the most exciting aspects of studying Greek Geometric pottery, of the tenth to eighth centuries BC, is its distribution over a very wide area, far beyond its centres of production. We find it exported over the entire Mediterranean and even beyond: to the east as far as Tell Halaf and Babylon, and to the west beyond the Pillars of Herakles to Huelva, the ancient Tartessos, on the Atlantic coast of Spain.

The history of East Mediterranean and Aegean interaction: Some when, how and why questions

in Hartmut Matthäus, Norbert Oettinger & Stephan Schröder (eds) 2011. Der Orient und die Anfänge Europas. Kulturelle Beziehungen von der Späten Bronzezeit bis zur Frühen Eisenzeit [Philippika, Marburger alterumskundliche Abhandlungen 42]. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz Verlag, 3-13.

It is probably true to say that the history of East Mediterranean and Aegean interaction goes back at least as far, and actually rather further, than the beginning of the Greek Neolithic, and that, although the nature of this interaction and the forms it took may have changed several times over the succeeding six millennia or so, it never stopped.

A manifesto for a social zooarchaeology. Swans and other beings in the Mesolithic

Archaeological Dialogues 20:2 (2013):111-136.

Recent, non-anthropocentric explorations of the interaction between human and non-human animals have resulted in many groundbreaking studies. In this ‘animalturn’, zooarchaeology, which deals with and has access to the material traces of animals that existed alongside humans over the last 2.5 million years, could occupy a privileged and influential position.

Bronze Age Trojan artefacts in Poland: some remarks

Anatolian Studies 62 (2012): 61-68.

This article focuses on several overlooked assemblages of the Bronze Age artefacts from Troy brought to light by H. Schliemann and W. Dörpfeld. It briefly presents the complicated history and partition of duplicate artefacts from the Berlin collection and their donation to many European institutions after Schliemann’s death.

The search for the prehistoric marble sources in the Cyclades

in Anna Gutiérrez Garcia-M., Pilar Lapuente Mercadal & Isabel Rodà de Llanza (eds) 2012. Interdisciplinary Studies on Ancient Stone. Proceedings of the IX Association for the Study of Marblesand Other Stones in Antiquity (ASMOSIA) Conference (Tarragona 2009). [Documenta 23], Tarragona: Institut Català d’Arqueologia Clàssica, 287-299.

The use of marble in prehistory and in particular in the Early Bronze Age is clearly evident in the Greek Cycladic islands where the famous Cycladic figurines appeared and spread all over the Aegean. However, the absence of quarrying traces in that period and the abundance of marble outcrops in most of the Cycladic islands makes the creation of reference databases very difficult and hence the determination of provenance of prehistoric artefacts quite demanding.

All That Rubble Leads to Trouble: Reassessing the Seismological Value of Archaeological Destruction Layers in Minoan Crete and Beyond

Seismological Research Letters 83:4 (July/August 2012): 736-742.

Since its discovery in the beginning of the twentieth century by British archaeologist Arthur Evans, the Bronze Age (Minoan) civilization of Crete (Greece, ca. 3000–1200 B.C.) received considerable scholarly, scientific, and popular attention.

Changing Technological and Social Environments in the Second Half of the Third Millennium BC in Cyprus

in Frankel, D., Webb, J.M. & Lawrence S. (eds), Archaeology in Environment and Technology: Intersections and Transformations (New York, 2013): 135-148.

Two major archaeologically recognisable cultural entities are visible in mid-third millennium BC Cyprus: an indigenous Late Chalcolithic dependent on hoe-based agriculture and a migrant Philia Early Bronze Age with a radically different social and technological system, including the cattle/plough complex.

Agricultural Economies and Pyrotechnologies in Bronze Age Jordan and Cyprus

in Frankel, D., Webb, J.M. & Lawrence S. (eds), Archaeology in Environment and Technology: Intersections and Transformations (New York, 2013): 123-134.

The development of early civilisations in the eastern Mediterranean and Near East is particularly noteworthy for the variety of paths whereby agrarian societies became increasingly differentiated, often invoking the periodic amalgamation and abandonment of urban communities.

Managing the Archaeological Heritage: The Case of Akrotiri, Thera (Santorini)

στο Alexopoulos, G. & Fouseki, K. (επιμ.), Managing Archaeological Sites [Conservation and Management of Archaeological Sites 15:1 (2013)]: 109-120.

This article deals with the archaeological site of Akrotiri on the Cycladic island of Thera (Santorini), Greece, and demonstrates, in particular, how the construction of a new protective shelter has provided an opportunity for enhancing the present and future conservation and management of the site in accordance with, among other values, the aspirations of the local community.

Domestic architecture in the Early Bronze Age of western Anatolia: the row-houses of Troy I

Anatolian Studies 63 (2013): 17-33.

Excavators have put forward opposing interpretations of the architectural sequence at the Early Bronze Age site of Troy. C.W. Blegen suggested that freestanding 'megaron' houses determined the visual pattern of the earliest settlement, while M.O. Korfmann compared Troy I to the circular layout of the Early Bronze Age site at Demircihüyük (the ‘Anatolian settlement plan’).