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Aegeus Society for Aegean Prehistory

EXCAVATIONS & RESEARCH

Ένας μεγάλος πολιτισμός χάνεται

Ένας μεγάλος πολιτισμός χάνεται

Η Εφορεία Αρχαιοτήτων Φλώρινας πραγματοποίησε τα τελευταία 15 χρόνια, στο πλαίσιο της σωστικής και ερευνητικής της αποστολής, σχεδόν αθόρυβα ένα πρωτοφανές σε κλίμακα για τα ελληνικά και ευρωπαϊκά δεδομένα ανασκαφικό έργο, εντάσσοντας με δυναμικό τρόπο την παραμεθόριο ζώνη της Λεκάνης του Αμυνταίου στο κέντρο του αρχαιολογικού χάρτης της χώρας.

The Minoan settlement of Zakros during the Late Minoan II and Late Minoan III periods

The Minoan settlement of Zakros during the Late Minoan II and Late Minoan III periods

The extensive destruction horizon documented in the Minoan Palace and the surrounding settlement of Kato Zakros is dated to the end of LM IB period, namely the mid-15th century B.C., a period called Zakros V according to the system of relative chronology proposed by Lefteris Platon for Zakros. The following period, Zakros VI, constitutes the subject of this short contribution.

Two new Linear B tablets from the Late Bronze Age settlement at ‘Kastro-Palaia’ in Volos: from the excavations of Dimitrios R. Theocharis to the results of the recent interdisciplinary investigations (in Greek)

Two new Linear B tablets from the Late Bronze Age settlement at ‘Kastro-Palaia’ in Volos: from the excavations of Dimitrios R. Theocharis to the results of the recent interdisciplinary investigations (in Greek)

Μεταξύ των ετών 1956 και 1961 ο Δημήτριος Θεοχάρης, τότε Έφορος Αρχαιοτήτων Θεσσαλίας και εταίρος της εν Αθήναις Αρχαιολογικής Εταιρείας, πραγματοποίησε ανασκαφές στον λόφο του Κάστρου των «Παλαιών», της συνοικίας που αποτελεί τον ιστορικό πυρήνα της σύγχρονης πόλης του Βόλου. Ο Θεοχάρης θέλησε να εξετάσει την ορθότητα της θεωρίας του Χρήστου Τσούντα, που είχε διατυπώσει από τις αρχές του 20ου αι., σύμφωνα με την οποία ο λόφος των «Παλαιών» ταυτίζεται με την αρχαία Ιωλκό.

Topography, Architecture and Socio-historical Structure in East Crete, during the Bronze Age

Topography, Architecture and Socio-historical Structure in East Crete, during the Bronze Age

This webpage presents the results of a research project of the Faculty of History and Archaeology of the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens. The project took place during the years 2003-2005 and its subject was the historical and social importance of the relationship between monuments and landscape in Crete during the Bronze Age. It has been argued that the landscape was both the medium and the outcome of human agency. Architectural monumentality played a special role in this dialectic relationship as it selectively highlighted different aspects of the landscape during each historical period.

Preliminary excavation report on the Mycenaean settlement of Tzannata (Kefalonia)

Preliminary excavation report on the Mycenaean settlement of Tzannata (Kefalonia)

A new rescue excavation, directed by Dr Andonis Vasilakis, Director of the 35th Ephoreia has taken place in August to October 2011 at the location ‘Riza’ near the village Tzannata/Poros, in the island of Kefalonia (Fig. 1). The new excavation has revealed part of a LH settlement, connected with the well known royal tholos tomb at the location ‘Bourtzi’, excavated by Dr Lazaros Kolonas in 1992. An area of about 750 square meters was excavated and so far the following ruins have been discovered.

The new Aegean World gallery in the redeveloped Ashmolean Museum

The new Aegean World gallery in the redeveloped Ashmolean Museum

The Ashmolean Museum in Oxford is the world’s oldest institutional public museum. Since its official re-opening on 2 December 2009, it is also among the newest. Named after Elias Ashmole, the Museum opened for the first time on 21 May 1683 in a building specifically built for that purpose in Broad Street, where today the Museum of the History of Science of the University of Oxford is housed. The foundation collections were formed by John Tradescant, father and son, both royal gardeners, and first put on display in their house in London in the 1630s.