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Aegeus Society For Aegean Prehistory

ARTICLES | 2009

A preliminary investigation of two prehistoric cave sites in southern Albania

The Annual of the British School at Athens 104 (2009) [February 2010]: 10-26.

In this article we describe the evaluation of two prehistoric sites situated within the coastal zone of south-western Albania, originally investigated by the Italian prehistorian Luigi Cardini in 1939. The first is a cave site in the town of Himara; the second a rock-shelter at Kanalit in the Acroceraunian Mountains to the north.

The Early Cycladic settlement at Dhaskalio, Keros: Preliminary report of the 2008 excavation season

The Annual of the British School at Athens 104 (2009) [February 2010]: 27-47.

The 2008 excavations on the small island of Dhaskalio opposite Dhaskalio Kavos on the Cycladic island of Keros are reviewed. An account is given of the survey, recording many walls of the early Bronze Age, and of the excavations, continued from the 2007 season.

A reassessment of Mackenzie’s second and third cities at Phylakopi

The Annual of the British School at Athens 104 (2009) [February 2010]: 49-72.

Duncan Mackenzie’s interpretation of the Phylakopi stratigraphy, which he presented in 1904 as the final chapter of the excavation report, continues to structure discussion of the site’s history. Mackenzie proposed a sequence of three ‘Cities’, which are seen to correspond to EC III, MC, and LC periods of occupation respectively.

The Late Minoan II-III and Mycenaean pottery from the 1911 excavations at Phylakopi on Melos

The Annual of the British School at Athens 104 (2009) [February 2010]: 73-135.

This article presents the Late Minoan II-III B and the Late Helladic I-III C pottery from the 1911 excavations of J. Dawkins and J. Droop at Phylakopi on Melos. The material from the 1911 excavations fills gaps in the corpus of pottery provided by the 1896-99 excavations and the 1974-77 excavations.

Art and Society in Cyprus from the Bronze Age into the Iron Age

Cambridge

Art and Society in Cyprus from the Bronze Age into the Iron Age

Dramatic social and political change marks the period from the end of the Late Bronze Age into the Iron Age (ca. 1300–700 BC) across the Mediterranean. Inland palatial centres of bureaucratic power weakened or collapsed ca. 1200 BC while entrepreneurial exchange by sea survived and even expanded, becoming the Mediterranean-wide network of Phoenician trade. At the heart of that system was Kition, one of the largest harbour cities of ancient Cyprus. Earlier research has suggested that Phoenician rule was established at Kition after the abandonment of part of its Bronze Age settlement.

Ethnè grecs à l’âge du Bronze. I: Introduction, Abantes-Epéens, II: Etoliens-Thessaliens (2 vols)

Athens

Ethnè grecs à l’âge du Bronze. I: Introduction, Abantes-Epéens, II: Etoliens-Thessaliens (2 vols) L’auteur s’emploie à identifier et situer, dans l’espace et dans le temps, les ethnè grecs apparus avant c.a. 1100/1050 de l’ère préchrétienne, sur la base à la fois d’éléments de tradition et d’indices onomastiques, culturels, institutionnels, dialectaux et autres, tous établis suivant de règles uniformes et après discussion critique détaillée. Les vingt-cinq chapitres, pour autant d’ethnè identifiés, sont précédés d’une introduction touchant : (1) à l’arrivée des Protogrecs, (2) à l’image d’un ethnos grec à l’âge du Bronze, et (3) aux normes à appliquer, et suivis de conclusions générales par trois unités thématiques : (1) description de chaque ethnos identifié, (2) pays où il se laisse repérer et dates respectives, et (3) les étapes de son expansion et, le cas échéant, sa diffusion.

Apiculture in the Prehistoric Aegean. Minoan and Mycenaean Symbols Revisited

Oxford

Apiculture in the Prehistoric Aegean. Minoan and Mycenaean Symbols Revisited This study surveys the evidence for beekeeping in the Prehistoric Aegean, from references in later literature to archaeological remains of beekeeping paraphernalia, symbolic depictions in jewellery and on seals, and the evidence of folklore and mythology. Finds of hives, smoking pots, honey extractors (some of them identified as such by the authors) and so-on indicate systematic Minoan apiculture, and the authors propose that contra Evans, seals can be reinterpreted as depicting apiculture, rather than religious scenes, and used by overseers of beekeeping, a high-status and highly valued industry.

Euboea and Central Greece

Athens

Euboea and Central Greece

The second volume Euboea and Central Greece in the series Archaeology completes the circumnavigation of the Aegean islands presented in the first volume; it then moves westwards towards the Ionian Sea, covering the southern part of the Greek Mainland, the region known today as Central Greece or Sterea Ellada. During historical times, this wide geographical region was not a discreet entity with a specific name, as were Thessaly, Epirus or the Peloponnese. Nevertheless, the prefectures of Central Greece (Attica, Boeotia, Phthiotis, Eurytania, Phocis, Aetoloakarnania), that is, the modern administrative-geographical districts, coincide for the greater part of their territory with the ancient regions that in Antiquity were defined as lands of ‘ethne’ or tribes.

Early prehistoric landscape and landuse in the Fier region of Albania

Journal of Mediterranean Archaeology 22.2 (December 2009): 151-182.

Little was known until recently about regional patterns of early prehistoric occupation in Albania, making it difficult to situate the Albanian record within existing, general models of early prehistoric landuse. An intensive regional survey, the Mallakastra Regional Archaeological Project (MRAP), carried out in the Fier region of central Albania from 1998-2003, gathered widespread evidence for human occupation during the Palaeolithic and Mesolithic periods, from the Myzeqe Plain to the Mallakastra hills.

Elite place-making and social interaction in the Late Cypriot Bronze Age

Journal of Mediterranean Archaeology 22.2 (December 2009): 183-209.

Monumental buildings constructed with ashlar masonry have long been recognized as a hallmark of the Late Cypriot (LC) period (ca. 1650-1100 BC). Yet little attention has been paid to the vital role they played in the (trans)formation of social structures and maintenance of elite power.

The perceived value of Minoan and Minoanizing pottery in Egypt

Journal of Mediterranean Archaeology 22.2 (December 2009): 211-234

This paper investigates the Egyptian valuation of imported Minoan and locally produced Minoanizing pottery: that is, why Egyptians found this pottery desirable, which Egyptians wanted it, and which were able to acquire it. In order to address these questions, this study first reviews the archaeological contexts of all Minoan and Minoanizing pottery in Egypt, and then compares this archaeological evidence to the textual and iconographic data on Egyptian attitudes towards Minoan goods.