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Aegeus Society For Aegean Prehistory

AEGEAN STUDIES | 2018

Bronze Weaponry and Cultural Mobility in Late Bronze Age Southeast Europe

In C. Horn & K. Kristiansen (eds) 2018. Warfare in Bronze Age Society, Cambridge: 81-100.

The collapse of the Bronze Age palatial centres in the Aegean transformed the societies surrounding the palaces and unbalanced the relationship between these areas and those immediately to the north. In Classical tradition, the Dorians invaded Greece in the twilight years of the palaces or soon thereafter, leading to collapse.

Παράκτιο παλίμψηστο: Παράδειγμα από το έργο του Πανεπιστημίου Πελοποννήσου στη νήσο Κεφαλληνία

In A. G. Simosi (ed.) 2018. Βουτιά στα Περασμένα. Η Υποβρύχια Αρχαιολογική Έρευνα, 1976-2014, Athens: 351-368.

“Archaeological Shoreline Research” (A.Sho.Re.) is an interdisciplinary Research Project of the University of the Peloponnese conducted in collaboration with the N.C.S.R. “Demokritos” and the Hellenic Centre for Marine Research. It explores the historical significance of the Coastal Zone through an extensive and systematic Geo-Archaeological Reconnaissance of SE Kephallenia, the Ionian Sea.

Αρχαίες άγκυρες από τον βυθό του Νότιο Ευβοϊκού

In A. G. Simosi (ed.) 2018. Βουτιά στα Περασμένα. Η Υποβρύχια Αρχαιολογική Έρευνα, 1976-2014, Athens: 125-152.

The Southern Euboean Gulf Project was a jointed underwater survey undertaken by the Ephorate of Underwater Antiquities and the Hellenic Institute of the Maritime Archaeology. The aim of the project was to survey large tracts of coastline in the area extended between Sounio, Kavalliani Island and Karystos in search for shipwrecks and traces of ancient navigation and trade.

Παράκτιες θέσεις, ενάλιες μαρτυρίες και διακίνηση πρώτων υλών στον Αργολικό κόλπο, κατά την Πρώιμη Εποχή του Χαλκού

In A. G. Simosi (ed.) 2018. Βουτιά στα Περασμένα. Η Υποβρύχια Αρχαιολογική Έρευνα, 1976-2014, Athens: 73-84.

One of the most frequented sea routes in the Aegean throughout the centuries is the one connecting the Saronic and the Argolic Gulfs. The first evidence for seafaring comes from the Mesolithic strata of Franchthi Cave (9000-7000 BC), which contained obsidian tools sourced to the island of Melos.

Το έργο της Εφορείας Εναλίων Αρχαιοτήτων τα έτη 1991-1993 και 2006-2007

In A. G. Simosi (ed.) 2018. Βουτιά στα Περασμένα. Η Υποβρύχια Αρχαιολογική Έρευνα, 1976-2014, Athens: 23-32.

Two ancient shipwrecks that were investigated and excavated by the Ephorate of Underwater Antiquities between 1991 and 2000 and also from 2003 to 2009 under the direction of the undersigned who served at the time as Deputy Head or Head of the Ephorate are worthy of special attention.

The Zooarchaeology of the Late Neolithic Strymon River Valley. The case of the Greek sector of Promachon–Topolniča in Macedo-nia, Greece

Oxford

The Zooarchaeology of the Late Neolithic Strymon River Valley. The case of the Greek sector of Promachon–Topolniča in Macedo-nia, Greece Excavations on the border between Greece (sector Promachon) and Bulgaria (sector Topolniča) in the basin of the river Strymonas, in Macedonia northern Greece, have revealed a ‘flat-extended’ settlement dating to the Late Neolithic. In addition to the rich array of material culture evidence, the excavation yielded a substantial quantity of animal bones, thus offering an unparalleled opportunity to study the human-animal relationships.

Akrotiri. The Archaeological Site and the Museum of Prehistoric Thera

Athens

Akrotiri. The Archaeological Site and the Museum of Prehistoric Thera Fifty years of systematic excavation, scientific research, study and conservation measures have revealed the history of the settlement at Akrotiri and the cultural achievements of the society that lived there. At the height of its prosperity, the cosmopolitan city one of the most important urban centres in the prehistoric Aegean, was struck by an earthquake that heralded the eruption of the Thera volcano, which buried it for posterity under a thick mantle of pumice and ash. The ruined buildings, the thousands of objects recovered from them and the remarkable wall-paintings that decorated them give us an insight into the daily life, the aesthetics and the ideology of the ‘bourgeois’ inhabitants of this once thriving port.