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Aegeus Society For Aegean Prehistory

DISSERTATIONS

Fabricating Signification: An Analysis of the Spatial Relationships Between Room Types in Minoan Monumental Architecture

Fabricating Signification: An Analysis of the Spatial Relationships Between Room Types in Minoan Monumental Architecture This dissertation analyzes the function of the Minoan “Palaces” in Late Bronze Age Crete. It also makes reference to numerous “Villas” termed “palatial.” The “Palaces” incorporate a “Labyrinthine” ground plan with elaborate halls, storage rooms, and industrial quarters grouped around a central court. Although general similarities exist in the layout of these buildings, regional variations exist in the distribution of room types and the relationships between rooms as determined by the placement of doorways and corridors.

To τοπίο στις τοιχογραφικές παραστάσεις του αιγαιακού χώρου κατά την Ύστερη Εποχή του Χαλκού (The Landscape on the Aegean Bronze Age wall-paintings)

To τοπίο στις τοιχογραφικές παραστάσεις του αιγαιακού χώρου κατά την Ύστερη Εποχή του Χαλκού (The Landscape on the Aegean Bronze Age wall-paintings) The main goal of this dissertation is to show how the iconography of the Aegean frescos could constitute multiple aspects of landscape experienced by the Aegean people of the Bronze Age. The researcher in order to achieve something like that should apply an approach by which the landscape would be seen under a “holistic” view, asking the help of other approaches, such as the Processual or even the Post-processual one. Thus, he would co-examine the depiction of natural environment on the different means of the material culture, e.g. on seals, pottery and jewellery crafting.

Mainland Polychrome Pottery in Mainland Greece and the Aegean

Mainland Polychrome Pottery in Mainland Greece and the Aegean Τhe subject of the thesis is a very impressive pottery ware, that bears decoration of two –or sometimes three- colors. The ware is known as “Mainland Polychrome” and makes its appearance at the dawn of the Late Bronze Age. Mainland Polychrome ware has not been the subject of a comprehensive study that takes into consideration the contextual environment of pots and sherds of this style from Mainland Greece and the Aegean islands. This enterprise is the main goal of the thesis. The study provides also the chronological basis for Mainland Polychrome pots and their context.

Domestic Architecture, Spatial Organisation and the Use of Space in the Early Iron Age in Island Greece

Domestic Architecture, Spatial Organisation and the Use of Space in the Early Iron Age in Island Greece This thesis examines evidence of domestic architecture and household activities in Greece between the end of the Bronze Age and the Archaic period (from the 12th to the 7th century B.C.) by putting forward an analysis of non-religious architectural structures in the Aegean, and demonstrating how settlement evidence can indicate social organisations and interactions. The focus of the study is the archaeological material of Island Greece rather than the mainland, and the chronological framework is the end of the Bronze Age and the beginning of the Iron Age.

Dawn of Discovery: The early British travellers to Crete and their contribution to the discovery of the island’s Bronze Age archaeological heritage

Dawn of Discovery: The early British travellers to Crete and their contribution to the discovery of the island’s Bronze Age archaeological heritage This thesis will focus on three important British travellers to Crete during the 18th and 19th centuries to establish whether or not they made any significant contribution to the field of research with regard to the archaeological heritage of Bronze Age Crete. It is an attempt to bring these ‘lost pioneers’ of antiquity to the fore and to recognize their work as part of the foundation of the discovery of the island’s Bronze Age archaeology prior to the groundbreaking excavations of Sir Arthur Evans. They are Richard Pococke (1704-1765), Robert Pashley (1805-1859) and Thomas Spratt (1811-1888).

Settlement and Social Trends in the Argolid and the Methana Peninsula, 1200 – 900 BC.

Settlement and Social Trends in the Argolid and the Methana Peninsula, 1200 – 900 BC. The central concern of my research is the ideology and socio-economic practices of the communities in the Argolid and the Methana Peninsula that existed during approximately 1200 BC through 900 BC. A thorough examination of mortuary practices, the built environment, ceramic material and metal objects demonstrate that during this transitional period an ideological shift took place alongside complex socio-economic developments. An analysis of the material evidence does not indicate poverty and disorganisation as has been previously argued. Rather, it illustrates the active formation of a new ideology and socio-economic practices that privileged the individual and the domestic unit over the larger corporate group.

Prolegomena to Aegean Archaeology; from the Renaissance until 1875

Prolegomena to Aegean Archaeology; from the Renaissance until 1875 This dissertation examines the foundations of what is now called ‘Aegean archaeology’ from the Renaissance until Heinrich Schliemann’s momentous discoveries at Mycenae in 1876. Although several books and chapters have been devoted to the history of Aegean prehistoric studies, most begin with either Schliemann’s excavations at Hisarlik and Mycenae or, in the case of Minoan archaeology, with Evans’s excavations at Knossos, thus implying that the period before the 1870s represents some kind of tabula rasa. Schliemann and Arthur Evans, who are usually regarded the ‘fathers’ of Mycenaean and Minoan archaeology respectively, may be the main discoverers of the material remains of ‘pre-classical’ Aegean civilisations, but their interpretations of these discoveries owe much to previous scholarship, although this has not been widely acknowledged. Moreover, even in terms of actual archaeological discoveries and general knowledge of prehistoric monuments and other finds, a great deal more was already known by the mid-late nineteenth century than is often recognised.