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Aegeus Society For Aegean Prehistory

USEFUL WEBSITES

Kythnos Excavation Project

URL: http://extras.ha.uth.gr/kythnos/index.php?page=home

The excavations at the site "Vryokastro" on the island of Kythnos (Cyclades) started in 2002 and continue until today. Before the start of the excavations, a systematic survey took place during the years 1990-1995 and 2001. The site is identified with the ancient city of 'Kythnos', which was inhabited from the 10th century BC up to the 6th-7th century AD. The excavations have brought to light a sanctuary of the Archaic, Classical and Hellenistic times.

Mochlos Excavation Project

URL: http://www.uncg.edu/arc/Mochlos/first.html

The Mochlos Excavation Project in eastern Crete is pleased to join the array of active archaeological projects now accessible via the Internet. This web site is designed to acquaint the public at large with the results of the excavation and with its latest publications.

Petras Excavations

URL: http://petras-excavations.gr/en

The present web-site was created, in the summer of 2010, on the occasion of the 25th anniversary of the research activities at Petras, the Minoan urban settlement and palace of Siteia. All excavations, surface surveys and studies, since 1985, are presented here.

Nestor. Bibliography of Aegean and Related Studies

URL: http://classics.uc.edu/nestor

Nestor is an international bibliography of Aegean studies, Homeric society, Indo-European linguistics, and related fields. It is published monthly from September to May (each volume covers one calendar year) by the Department of Classics, University of Cincinnati. An Authors Index accompanies the December issue. Nestor is distributed in 30 countries world-wide. It is currently edited by Carol R. Hershenson.

Archaeological Institute of America (AIA)

URL: http://www.archaeological.org

The Archaeological Institute of America (AIA) is North America's oldest and largest organization devoted to the world of archaeology. The Institute is a nonprofit group founded in 1879 and chartered by the United States Congress in 1906. Today, the AIA has nearly 250,000 Members belonging to more than 100 Local Societies in the United States, Canada, and overseas. The organization is unique because it counts among its Members professional archaeologists, students, and many others from all walks of life. This diverse group is united by a shared passion for archaeology and its role in furthering human knowledge.

The Pylos project (University of Minnesota)

URL: http://marwp.cla.umn.edu/marwp/pylos.html

The Palace of Nestor, on the Epano Englianos ridge in southwestern Messenia, was discovered in 1939 and excavated from 1952 to 1966 by the late Professor Carl Blegen of the University of Cincinnati. The palace, dating from ca. 1300-1200 BC, is among the best preserved of Bronze Age complexes in Greece. In addition to architecture, excavations uncovered wall and floor frescos, Linear B tablets (the first ever discovered on the mainland), sealings, jewelry, pottery and other artifacts.

Pylos Regional Archaeological Project (PRAP)

URL: http://classics.uc.edu/prap

The Pylos Regional Archaeological Project (PRAP) is a multi-disciplinary, diachronic archaeological expedition formally organised in 1990 to investigate the history of prehistoric and historic settlement and land use in western Messenia in Greece, in an area centered on the Bronze Age administrative center known as the Palace of Nestor.

Kretika Chronika (Κρητικά Χρονικά)

URL: http://64.244.59.70/IMH/index.aspx?l=En

Kretika Chronika was a groundbreaking journal published in Heraklion from 1947 onwards by Andreas G. Kalokerinos. For many decades it was one of the primary catalysts for Cretan studies. Its pages hosted hundreds of original articles and studies in the fields of archaeology, history, folklore and literary scholarship, focused on the history and culture of Crete from ancient times to the early 20th century.

Priniatikos Pyrgos

URL: http://www.priniatikos.net/PPhome.html

Priniatikos Pyrgos is a limestone headland jutting out into the southwest corner of the Gulf of Mirabello in East Crete. The research so far has revealed evidence of prehistoric industrial activity (e.g. two pottery kilns) and settlement, part of the Classical and Hellenistic city plan of Istron and a previously undiscovered Byzantine ecclesiastical site of regional importance.

Petrota. Surveying Palaeolithic & Neolithic Stone Sources in Greece

URL: http://petrotasurvey.hist-arch.uoi.gr

The Petrota graben, an area c. 100 sq. km in Greek Thrace, is rich in sources of siliceous rocks suitable for the manufacture of stone tools. Some of the sources were exploited in prehistory, from the Middle Palaeolithic on.
The area has been under archaeological exploration since 1998. The information you find in these pages is based on the first five seasons of fieldwork, until 2005. It is likely to change drastically as fieldwork and study of the material continue.

Dispilio excavations

URL: http://dispilio.web.auth.gr

The first indications for the existence of a prehistoric lakeside settlement at the village Dispilio, near the Kastoria Lake were attested in the dry winter of 1932, when a vast number of wooden posts, potsherds and stone tools revealed because of the dramatically lowered water level of the lake. Professor A. Keramo-poulos undertook a limited survey back then and after almost 30 years, this time an architect and Professor of the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, N. Moutsopoulos undertook a new survey that led to a more complete description. Since 1992 excavations are carried out by Prof. George Hourmouziadis (Aristotle University of Thessaloniki).

Drakaina Cave

URL: http://www.drakainacave.gr/index.php?lang=en

Drakaina cave is situated on the steep slopes of the impressive Gorge of Poros, a small modern village on the southeast coast of Kefalonia island in the Ionian Sea, Western Greece. Excavations carried out between 1992 and 2005 revealed a long and complex sequence of human activity spanning the Late Neolithic (mid 6th millennium BC) through the Early Bronze Age (mid 3rd millennium BC).