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Αιγεύς Εταιρεία Αιγαιακής Προϊστορίας

ΑΡΘΡΑ | 2020

The insular ecology and palaeoenvironmental impacts of the domestic goat (Capra hircus) in Mediterranean Neolithization

Στο M. Ghilardi, F. Leandri, J. Bloemendal, L. Lespez & S. Fachard (eds) 2016. Géoarchélogie des îles de Mediterranée, Paris: 47-56.

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We consider the insular ecology of Capra hircus and suggest that its introduction into Quercus-dominated Mediterranean environments would have resulted in dramatically increased predation on plant genera that were not adapted for ovicaprid herbivory. This would have driven a series of corresponding changes, including the sheet erosion of topsoils and ecological release in competitor taxa. These changes – possibly including localized extinctions – may possibly have been more substantial than those effected via direct human agency.

Late Pleistocene to Early Holocene Sea-Crossings in the Aegean: Direct, Indirect and Controversial Evidence

Στο M. Ghilardi, F. Leandri, J. Bloemendal, L. Lespez & S. Fachard (eds) 2016. Géoarchélogie des îles de Mediterranée, Paris: 33-46.

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This paper reviews the geoarchaeological evidence for the early prehistoric sea-crossings in the Aegean (Eastern Mediterranean). It stresses the differences in character and scale between the initial serendipitous crossings and the fully-organised maritime networks of the later parts of prehistory.

La diffusion du Néolithique en Méditerranée

Στο M. Ghilardi, F. Leandri, J. Bloemendal, L. Lespez & S. Fachard (eds) 2016. Géoarchélogie des îles de Mediterranée, Paris: 23-32.

Cet article propose une synthèse sur la chronologie et les caractères de la diffusion du Néolithique depuis le Proche-Orient jusqu’au Maroc à travers l’espace méditerranéen. Après avoir résumé les principales étapes de l’émergence de l’économie agricole dans la zone levantine, le cas de Chypre est plus particulièrement évoqué: les répercussions des avancées continentales y sont précoces, dès le Xe millénaire avant notre ère, tandis que l’île évoluera ensuite vers un conservatisme particulier (culture de Khirokitia).

Examining the chaîne opératoire of the Late Cypriot II-IIIA Female Terracotta Figurines: Preliminary Results of the Experimental Approach

Στο R. Maguire & J. Chick (eds) 2016. Approaching Cyprus. Proceedings of the Post-Graduate Conference of Cypriot Archaeology (PoCA) held at the University of East Anglia, Norwich, 1st-3rd November 2013, Newcastle upon Tyne: 98-109.

Broadly speaking, the handmade female terracottas can be stylistically separated into two groups comprising both hollow and solid examples: the so called “bird-headed” (Type A) and “flat-headed” (Type B) figurines. While examining their chaîne opératoire, an experimental methodology was employed to draw out additional information relating to their manufacture.

The Development of Protohistoric Jewellery from Cyprus and the Aegean: An Analysis with Special Reference to Signs of Cultural Interconnections

Στο R. Maguire & J. Chick (eds) 2016. Approaching Cyprus. Proceedings of the Post-Graduate Conference of Cypriot Archaeology (PoCA) held at the University of East Anglia, Norwich, 1st-3rd November 2013, Newcastle upon Tyne: 40-59.

The aim of the following analysis is an identification of changes and continuity in the style and composition of the jewellery which occurred in Cyprus and the Aegean during the Late Bronze Age and the (Early) Iron Age.

Libations and the Use of Mycenaean Conical Rhyta in Ritual Practice in the Late Cypriot IIA-IIIA Periods

Στο R. Maguire & J. Chick (eds) 2016. Approaching Cyprus. Proceedings of the Post-Graduate Conference of Cypriot Archaeology (PoCA) held at the University of East Anglia, Norwich, 1st-3rd November 2013, Newcastle upon Tyne: 22-39.

The end of the Late Bronze Age in Cyprus is a time of multiple social and economic transformations. This period is often characterized by substantial culture contact due to developments in seafaring as well as intensification of the copper industry, significant trade with the Aegean, and a reworking of ritual spaces.

A Linguistic Approach to Population Movement to Ancient Cyprus

Στο R. Maguire & J. Chick (eds) 2016. Approaching Cyprus. Proceedings of the Post-Graduate Conference of Cypriot Archaeology (PoCA) held at the University of East Anglia, Norwich, 1st-3rd November 2013, Newcastle upon Tyne): 2-21.

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This chapter seeks to integrate the direct linguistic data with the archaeological, and suggests that a wholescale migration episode does not reflect the evidence well. Instead, it is argued that we should view the arrival of the Greek language on Cyprus as a long-term process during which speakers of other Cypriot languages chose to start speaking Greek, a hypothesis not incompatible with the “hybridisation” model of understanding social change on the island in this period.

Scene di prothesis e di deposizione a Creta e sul continente greco in età micenea

Στο F. Longo, R. di Cesare & S. Privitera (eds) 2016. ΔΡΟΜΟΙ. Studi sul mondo antico offerti a Emanuele Greco dagli allievi della Scuola Archeologica Italiana di Atene, Atene-Paestum: 681-694.

This paper deals with depictions of two specific moments of the Late Bronze Age III funeral ritual that are poorly attested in Aegean art, both on Crete and on the mainland, namely, the exposure of the deceased (prothesis) and his or her subsequent deposition in the coffin.

“Apparire” o “essere”? Questioni di status nella Creta palaziale

Στο F. Longo, R. di Cesare & S. Privitera (eds) 2016. ΔΡΟΜΟΙ. Studi sul mondo antico offerti a Emanuele Greco dagli allievi della Scuola Archeologica Italiana di Atene, Atene-Paestum: 669-680.

Earlier studies have showed that Minoan iconography placed special emphasis on the connection of attire and hairstyle with the age of individuals. The article argues that this emphasis was due to the key role that corporative groups structured on an age basis played in social life and the management of political power in palatial Crete.

La ceramica in contesto. L’ edificio protopalaziale sull’ Acropoli Mediana di Festos nel MM IIB

Στο F. Longo, R. di Cesare & S. Privitera (eds) 2016. ΔΡΟΜΟΙ. Studi sul mondo antico offerti a Emanuele Greco dagli allievi della Scuola Archeologica Italiana di Atene, Atene-Paestum: 437-446.

The protopalatial building comprising rooms CV, CVI and CVII is located 100 m west of the Palace of Phaistos, on the southwestern slope of the so-called “Middle Acropolis’’. The complex, which was the object of a rescue excavation between 1969 and 1971, shows features setting it sharply apart from the other domestic structures unearthed outside the palace area. These features suggest it was a building with special functions.

Ristrutturando il Primo Palazzo di Festos. Materiali di scarto dallo scarico del Bastione II

Στο F. Longo, R. di Cesare & S. Privitera (eds) 2016. ΔΡΟΜΟΙ. Studi sul mondo antico offerti a Emanuele Greco dagli allievi della Scuola Archeologica Italiana di Atene, Atene-Paestum: 425-436.

The dump of “Bastione II’’, found by Doro Levi during his 1950-1966 excavation of the Minoan site of Phaistos, is located on the northern edge of the Lower West Court of the First Palace, and is one of the most conspicuous deliberate fills of Protopalatial Phaistos. Recently studied and interpreted as a homogeneous deposit of MM IIA, it includes not only a large amount of pottery, but also many plaster fragments and other construction debris.

Lemno e l’ Egeo settentrionale agli inizi del I millenio: alcune riflessioni sulla cultura materiale dell’ isola

Στο F. Longo, R. di Cesare & S. Privitera (eds) 2016. ΔΡΟΜΟΙ. Studi sul mondo antico offerti a Emanuele Greco dagli allievi della Scuola Archeologica Italiana di Atene, Atene-Paestum: 285-296.

The aim of this paper is to present the research on Lemnian material culture in the Early Iron Age that the author has been conducting, along with the team of the Italian Archaeological School in Athens coordinated by E. Greco, over the last 10 years. The focus of the author’s investigation is a pottery assemblage from Hephaestia (Lemnos), which contains, above all, a large amount of Grey Ware and a few sherds of Protogeometric amphorae (the only imported vases in that period).

Osservazioni su una fibula del Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Atene

Στο F. Longo, R. di Cesare & S. Privitera (eds) 2016. ΔΡΟΜΟΙ. Studi sul mondo antico offerti a Emanuele Greco dagli allievi della Scuola Archeologica Italiana di Atene, Atene-Paestum: 277-283.

Starting from a bronze fibula in the National Archaeological Museum of Athens, the author examines the spread of ornaments through Greece and Italy in LHIIIB and LHIIIC over an extensive trade network supplying raw materials and valuable artifacts throughout the Mediterranean. An intrinsic component of personal attire, fibulae belong to those categories of bronze artifacts embedded in broader circuits and therefore defined as ‘international bronzes.

Oggetti d’ ornamento, gioielli e altri reperti mobili dalle necropoli micenee di Eleona e Langada a Kos

Στο F. Longo, R. di Cesare & S. Privitera (eds) 2016. ΔΡΟΜΟΙ. Studi sul mondo antico offerti a Emanuele Greco dagli allievi della Scuola Archeologica Italiana di Atene, Atene-Paestum: 257-275.

A comparison with the evidence from the cemetery of lalysos on Rhodes shows the existence of similar trends. These common traits suggest that, within the second part of the LBA period, despite its connections with the Greek mainland, the southeast Aegean formed a distinct Mycenaean region that was closely related to neighboring sites in south west Anatolia.

Omero, Maratona e Atene dalle ampie strade (Od. VII 78-81). Una nota sulla rappresentazione dell’ Atene micenea sotto I Pisistratidi

Στο F. Longo, R. di Cesare & S. Privitera (eds) 2016. ΔΡΟΜΟΙ. Studi sul mondo antico offerti a Emanuele Greco dagli allievi della Scuola Archeologica Italiana di Atene, Atene-Paestum: 111-117.

The reference to Marathon seems to imply that the goddess landed on the northeast coast of Attica, as if she were coming from Euboea or some other North Aegean island. This is entirely inconsistent with all the ancient traditions, which located the mythical island of Scheria at the westernmost limits of the world, but seems to hint at Peisistratus’ march in 547/6BC, which started from Marathon and led to his victory in the battle of Pallene. The author argues that Marathon is mentioned in this passage to acknowledge its connection with Peisistratus, and that the goddess Athena is accordingly represented as retracing Peisistratus’ route. This suggests that the passage is an interpolation of the 6th century BC.